Lined with 19th Century buildings and 100-year-old trees
Terang is a town rich in  hardy early pioneering spirit

How to get to Terang

Terang

Bandstands and Grandstands

Located 2.5 hours from Melbourne Terang is one of the oldest rural towns in the state and is noted for its grand, historic trees, many more than 100 years old and National Trust classified. Terang is named from an Aboriginal word meaning “a twig with leaves”.

Take a ride out north of town on a 5km trail that connects Terang to the charming village of Noorat nestled at the foot of the volcanic cone and deep crater of Mount Noorat.  

Why not plan a trip around a horse racing meeting, enjoy country racing at it's finest in the shadow of a heritage listed grandstand or come and take in Terang's Country Music Festival held every March?

History and Horses

If you have a passion for either you should visit Terang - located in the Western District of Victoria.

Terang has a long standing connection with horse racing; Horse Racing, (Gallops) and Harness Racing (Trots) have clubs established here more than a century ago. Terang is a National Trust Town of Historic Trees.  A Heritage Trail of the town takes you past numerous impressive buildings constructed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. These include buildings such as the Thompson Memorial Church; the Post office and Clock Tower; the Band Rotunda and the Railway Station.

The Historic Iron Grandstand at the Terang Race course was built late in the 19th Century. The Terang Dry Lake Bed is home to numerous sporting organisations including the Mount Emu Creek Pony Club.

Horse racing
Mount Noorat

Let's Jump puddles

Take a walk up Mt Noorat on the Alan Marshall Walking Track and you will have sweeping views of the area which forms part of the setting of the famous Australian novel  –“I can jump puddles”.  Alan Marshall was born and spent his early years in Noorat and his novel is a thinly disguised autobiography of those early years.

Mount Noorat is a dry volcanic crater, standing 310 metres above sea level, while the base of the crater is lower than the level of the surrounding plain. The mount was a traditional meetings and bartering place for the local Aboriginal people and was named after an Aboriginal Elder – Ngoora.